SIX by Julie Marie Wade
Aug07

SIX by Julie Marie Wade

  SIX, winner of the 2014 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize. Judge: C.D. Wright Buy this Book    Search for a Reading of SIX Near You “I call six times just to be sure you heard,” this speaker announces on the first page. These poems are also the six calls—calls to attention, calls to action, calls to account for something of our own. The speaker in SIX is insistent, scrupulous, and unflinching as she plumbs six essential aspects of human experience that have shaped us all: art, language, desire, vocation, faith, and life-changing love.   I chose SIX not in spite of but because of its discursiveness, its willingness to wander through the poem with technique at hand, but also a permit to allow both substantive and ephemeral material to wander into the field of the poem and exit without a conclusive goal in mind. It’s an accumulative project, inclusive, and busy about the business of sifting and sorting through this thing we call life that we carry out in this creation we call a body on this tumultuous blue orb we call earth. —C.D. Wright Julie Marie Wade is the author of four collections of poetry, including When I Was Straight (A Midsummer Night’s Press, 2014) and Postage Due (White Pine Press, 2010), and four collections of lyric nonfiction, including Catechism: A Love Story (Noctuary Press, 2016) and Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures (Bywater Books, 2014; Colgate University Press, 2010). She has received an Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council, a grant from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund, and the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Memoir. She teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University...

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River Electric with Light by Sarah Wetzel
Nov24

River Electric with Light by Sarah Wetzel

River Electric with Light, winner of the 2012 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize. Judge: Tracy K. Smith Buy this Book “Sarah Wetzel’s River Electric with Light is a work in search of the sacred and the spiritually significant. Touching down in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, Kabul, New York, and Rome, Wetzel’s poems, ranging from lyric meditations to discursive drama, weave themselves from her life as wife, lover, stepmother, and traveler. She names the force propelling her River—“If I must choose a word for you, / let it be the word / for what flows,” she writes. At times joyful, at times grief-ridden, her poems accumulate associatively, riven together by a common quest. Wetzel’s worship is, like her worship of rivers, the worship of the continuing.” Publisher, Red Hen Press Like the river of the collection’s title, these poems ride upon a current of arduous insight and indelible imagery. And, like all courageous writing does, they make their own particular peace with the likelihood that even our most insistent questions—about love and human cruelty and belief—will never be adequately answered. —Tracy K....

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t’ai freedom ford Awarded 2015 To the Lighthouse Prize
Jul01

t’ai freedom ford Awarded 2015 To the Lighthouse Prize

t’ai freedom ford is a New York City high school English teacher, Cave Canem Fellow, and Pushcart Prize nominee. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Drunken Boat, Sinister Wisdom, No, Dear, The African American Review, Vinyl, Nepantla, Poetry and others. Her work has also been featured in several anthologies including The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop. In 2012 and 2013, she completed two multi-city tours as a part of a queer women of color literary salon, The Revival. In 2014, she was the winner of The Feminist Wire’s inaugural poetry contest judged by Evie Shockley. She is currently a 2015 Center for Fiction Fellow. t’ai lives and loves in Brooklyn, but hangs out digitally at: shesaidword.com “how to get over,” t’ai freedom ford’s electric, rhythmic manuscript, is AROHO’s 2015 To the Lighthouse Poetry Book Prize winner   Finalist Judge Alicia Stallings writes:  “I was struck by two seemingly opposite qualities of this book—its electricity (charged by the poles of Strife and Love), and its containment and mastery, words that might seem at first at odds with the poet’s concerns with racial oppression and sexual identity.  Yet in these poems, full of jostling rhymes, elaborate rhythms, well-weighed syllabics, received and invented forms, deft improvisations, sonnets and bops, the poet confronts public tragedies and private trauma with craft and music, subverting and incorporating tradition. Take “ode to an African urn:  for Trayvon and them/ after Keats” in which the poet responds to the interrogation of Keats’ cold pastoral by questioning the premature death of another young man, in three taut triolets, the first of which goes:   what men or gods are these? what mad pursuit? what sin or odd odds are these? what men and gods are these what unarmed boys down on bruised knees? what mad blue suits? what men or gods are these? what mad pursuit? Keats’ urn tells us beauty is truth, truth beauty:  that’s all we need to know.  This vessel also has an unstoppered mouth, other things to say.” Special congratulations also to Finalist Joni Wallace, for her manuscript, “Kingdom Come Radio Show,” to Finalist Gillian Cummings, for her manuscript, “A Woman of Water,” to Finalist E.C. Belli, for her manuscript, “Wick Effect,” and to the three-hundred and seventy authors whose top-notch manuscripts we had the pleasure of...

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i built a boat with all the towels in your closet, by Leia Penina Wilson
May18

i built a boat with all the towels in your closet, by Leia Penina Wilson

i built a boat with all the towels in your closet (and will let you drown), winner of the 2012 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize. Judge:  Evie Shockley Buy this Book Leia Penina Wilson’s i built a boat with all the towels in your closet (and will let you drown) is at once a love ballad and a warning. These poems are—at their simplest—about relationships, sex, love, creatures, different kinds (and degrees) of violence, and—at their most complex—about the limits of the imagination, of language, and about the power the imagination has over the body. These poems confront the shifty line between human and animal, and urge the question: at what cost the body. Wilson’s animal-human doesn’t intend to answer that question; instead, she lunges towards it and tears it up and begins again, and again, and again. Read more about Leia Penina Wilson and the To the Lighthouse Book Prize. I was mesmerized by the wild lyricism, quiet wit, and fearless curiosity of these poems. I feel lucky to have encountered them and am delighted to recognize them with the To the Lighthouse Prize. ­—Evie...

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Submit Smart, Submit Relentlessly
Mar18

Submit Smart, Submit Relentlessly

April 1st To the Lighthouse Poetry and Clarissa Dalloway “everything but poetry” Book Prize Deadline AROHO asked past To the Lighthouse Winners Julie Marie Wade, Leia Penina Wilson, and Carolyn Guinzio, and Clarissa Dalloway winner Anna Maria Hong, about what winning the TTL and CD Book Prizes has meant to their lives and careers, and about what it took to get there. And now we’re asking you… Have you stopped too soon? JMW: I submitted SIX well over a hundred times to various poetry book contests, and in its eight years of circulation, the book was a finalist 36 times. … You must be relentless. You must not be dissuaded or discouraged. When you have written and revised each piece of work or compilation to its fullest potential, it’s time to send it out into the world and keep sending it out into the world for as long as it takes. This can be years. Don’t give up. If you give up and take yourself out of the game all together, you’ll never have a chance to win. And sometimes, as was my experience with AROHO, you get close, but you don’t hit the bull’s eye right away. All the more reason to submit again and again. Pay attention to those loving rejections, those almost-not-quites, and use them as a guide. Consider everything a possibility, but watch for the clues that suggest what might be especially probable. A past commendation or invitation to submit again should never be overlooked. (Julie Marie Wade’s Full Interview) Do you believe in the “thingness” of your work? LPW: There’s something real and true about holding something. I saw a jackrabbit for the first time last fall and I went towards it to hold because it was the strangest creature and I wanted to affirm its adorable reality—that’s what holding the book was like. The book was a little ephemeral before that for me—having it in my hands for the first time made it more than an idea. To hold my book as an artifact of everybody’s effort and support (AROHO, Red Hen, my friends who put up with reading those poems in or listening at readings or sitting around drinking and playing games, Professors that were generous enough to set me back on course when I needed that poetic compass, my family for their support when I told them I was going to school for words, to maybe be that thing called author (such an imaginary bird!)) was a moment I will not soon forget. (Leia Penina Wilson’s Full Interview)  Are you smart about submitting? (Brave…but smart?) CG: Submit your work, women writers! To the Orlando Prize, to the To...

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Interview with Jessica Piazza
Nov01

Interview with Jessica Piazza

“Winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize didn’t impact my career. It launched it. It allowed it.” AROHO asked 2011 To the Lighthouse Winner Jessica Piazza about what winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize has meant to her and about what it took to get there. AROHO: Has winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize impacted either you personally or your writing career overall? If so, in what ways? JP: Winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize didn’t impact my career. It launched it. It allowed it. I was a student of poetry, a poet published in many magazines, but didn’t have anything even remotely like a poetry career until Eloise Klein Healy chose my book for this prize. It was the kind of experience one might organize one’s life around. There was Before winning the AROHO prize, and After. (Yes, in capitals.) And After has been much, much better. What advice would you give to those considering submitting their work, to the AROHO Book Prizes or elsewhere? JP: If you love your work, don’t stop sending. Most people don’t hit right away. Don’t be discouraged; just keep submitting. However, definitely reread your own book a few times a year. If there comes a time when you don’t love it anymore, reassess. But as long as you love it, keep fighting for it. As for sending particularly to AROHO? Just do it. Now. AROHO: Do you have anything exciting that you’re currently working on? JP: A few things. I’m particularly proud of the website I started recently called “Poetry Has Value” (www.poetryhasvalue.com) It’s centered around a pledge I made to only submit poems to paying journals and magazines through all of 2015. It was intended as an experiment that might spark conversations about poetry, money and worth. From there it’s grown way bigger than my own experiences, though. I’ve had amazing guest bloggers join the conversation (from Sandra Beasley and Terry Wolverton to Dan Brady and Dena Rash Guzman), and I’ve interviewed editors of publications that pay poets so that they might offer advice and resources for those who are interested in a paying model. I’ve also created a public, fully editable google document listing journals and magazines that pay writers, in case poets are interested in going that route. It’s really exciting. As for my own writing, I have a book coming out with Red Hen called Obliterations. It’s co-written with Heather Aimee O’Neill, and it’s all erasure poems of New York Times articles. I’m publishing work from there in periodicals now, though it won’t be out until 2017. I’m also trying to work on a series of very short poems, though...

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Interview with Julie Marie Wade
Nov01

Interview with Julie Marie Wade

“You must be relentless. You must not be dissuaded or discouraged. When you have written and revised each piece of work or compilation to its fullest potential, it’s time to send it out into the world and keep sending it out into the world for as long as it takes. This can be years. Don’t give up.” AROHO asked 2014 To the Lighthouse Winner Julie Marie Wade about what winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize has meant to her and about what it took to get there. AROHO: Has winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize impacted either you personally or your writing career overall? If so, in what ways? JMW: Oh, it most certainly has! As a feminist, I believe in AROHO’s mission to support women writers and artists, and I feel honored to be one of the women writers supported by the foundation. Virginia Woolf’s body of work, particularly A Room of One’s Own and To the Lighthouse, has been a source of immense inspiration in my writing and teaching life for years, so the title of the award is meaningful as well. And to add even more serendipity to the mix, I began writing SIX many years ago after taking a transformative experimental poetics class taught by Bruce Beasley at Western Washington University, where I was introduced to the poetry of C.D. Wright. Deepstep, Come Shining is one of the most important poetry collections I have ever read, a book that encouraged me to open myself to the possibility of writing longer and more intricately constructed poems. SIX is in fact a collection of six, long poems, the most complex project I have ever undertaken to write, and the fact that it was chosen by C.D. Wright, a long-time poet-hero, leaves me overwhelmed with gratitude. What advice would you give to those considering submitting their work, to the AROHO Book Prizes or elsewhere? JMW: I keep a record of my own history of rejection, which grows far faster than my list of acceptances and inevitably longer with each passing year. I submitted SIX well over a hundred times to various poetry book contests, and in its eight years of circulation, the book was a finalist 36 times. I also had individual poems and essays and other volumes of work in circulation simultaneously–part of the don’t-put-all-your-eggs-in-one-basket approach to submission. I know a different poetry collection of mine, D R IF T, was a finalist for the AROHO/To the Lighthouse Prize at least once and possibly twice before I decided to submit SIX. So in general, I would advise other writers: You must be relentless. You must not be...

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Interview with Carolyn Guinzio
Nov01

Interview with Carolyn Guinzio

“Submit your work, women writers! To the Orlando Prize, to the To The Lighthouse Prize— to everything for which it is appropriate. That is a caveat, especially since contest fees add up quickly. Know the work of the judge, and make some calculated choices based on aesthetics.” AROHO asked 2010 To the Lighthouse Winner Carolyn Guinzio about what winning the To the Lighthouse Poetry Book Prize has meant to her and about what it took to get there. AROHO: Has winning the To the Lighthouse Poetry Book Prize impacted either you personally or your writing career overall? If so, in what ways? CG: Having Spoke & Dark selected by Alice Quinn for the To The Lighthouse prize was one of the best things that ever happened in my poetry career. I had known and admired AROHO for for so long for their trailblazing and legendary work on behalf of women writers. I’ll always be immensely grateful to them and honored to have my name among the hundreds of writers they have supported through the years. AROHO: What advice would you give to those considering submitting their work, to the AROHO Book Prizes or elsewhere? CG: Submit your work, women writers! To the Orlando Prize, to the To The Lighthouse Prize— to everything for which it is appropriate. That is a caveat, especially since contest fees add up quickly. Know the work of the judge, and make some calculated choices based on aesthetics. AROHO: Do you have anything exciting that you’re currently working on? CG: Through winning the prize, I’ve connected with so many writers. Further, it gave me the confidence to go in a different direction with my next project. My fourth book, Spine, will be out in Fall, 2015, and because of my positive experience with AROHO, I felt braver in taking risks with my work.   Read more about AROHO’s Book Prizes and...

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Interview with Leia Penina Wilson
Nov01

Interview with Leia Penina Wilson

“Sometimes you have to be a snob. Nobody else is going to do that work for you. You have to be generous to yourself. You have to unshy yourself.” AROHO asked 2014 To the Lighthouse Winner Leia Penina Wilson about what winning the To the Lighthouse Book Prize has meant to her and about what it took to get there. AROHO: If we’re remembering correctly, the first time you held the final published product of i built a boat was at the AROHO/Red Hen Press reading at the Annenberg Beach House last October. What was that like? LPW: It was! O I was super thrilled, to hold the physical thing in my hands! There’s something real and true about holding something. I saw a jackrabbit for the first time last fall and I went towards it to hold because it was the strangest creature and I wanted to affirm its adorable reality—that’s what holding the book was like. The book was a little ephemeral before that for me—having it in my hands for the first time made it more than an idea. To hold my book as an artifact of everybody’s effort and support (AROHO, Red Hen, my friends who put up with reading those poems in or listening at readings or sitting around drinking and playing games, Professors that were generous enough to set me back on course when I needed that poetic compass, my family for their support when I told them I was going to school for words, to maybe be that thing called author (such an imaginary bird!)) was a moment I will not soon forget—and the sky that day so purple, red, orange. To share my poems and sunset with all the people who came out to the reading makes the whole moment a most embodied ode. I have only gratitude. AROHO: What advice would you give to those considering submitting their work, to the AROHO Book Prizes or elsewhere? LPW: Submit! Right now! Go! I understand that initial hesitation to submit, the crumbling of your soul as you send your beloved off on its own (at least that’s how I felt for about a minute)—you have to move passed whatever stays your hand. A few winters ago I was at home, working on a manuscript submission, making a list of where to submit and how much each submission would cost. My mom came into the kitchen, I told her what I was doing—she says is that enough? And she gives me her credit card and tells me she’ll pay the submission fees, says it’s an investment. It’s an investment. If someone else was willing to believe...

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A Lighthouse (Reading) on the Beach
Oct23

A Lighthouse (Reading) on the Beach

  On Tuesday, October 14th, 2014, AROHO and our fabulous partners at Red Hen Press came together with a full crowd of friends and arts enthusiasts for a reading at the Annenberg Community Beach House featuring To the Lighthouse winners, Genevieve Kaplan, Jessica Piazza, and Leia Penina Wilson.  The room was packed, the energy high, and the poetry at once riveting and uplifting, playful and powerful. Being together with so many friends was nothing short of magical. The Pacific Ocean provided a spectacular backdrop, and moderator Mary Johnson (AROHO Board Member) gave fun and unorthodox introductions to the books of each of our readers as well as that of the other Lighthouse winner, Carolyn Guinzio, with her book already published by Red Hen. We look forward to Sarah Wetzel’s River Electric with Light and Julie Marie Wade’s SIX joining this excellent collection of published works! Mary talked about her own experience of reading these books “cover to cover,” as poetry is so often not read, and she encouraged everyone present to pick up a book to take home and read. For those less likely to read an entire book of poems, she gave each book a little primer: “These poems taught me how to read them…. This book is for people who like birds. This one is square-shaped. This one is an adult Dr. Seuss. This one has fantastic titles.”   Genevieve read from her Lighthouse book in the ice house as well as from her collection of erasure poems, settings for these scenes, all created by “erasing” parts of a source text from Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. Jessica read sonnets (each one treating different clinical phobias and philias) from her Lighthouse book Interrobang as well as work from her new chapbook of ekphrastic poems, This is not a Sky. Leia, who held her published Lighthouse book  i built a boat with all the towels in your closet (and will let you drown) for the first time that evening, read from that collection as well as other new (and equally beautiful, terrifying, and fantastically-titled) poems. Each poet was amazing, her poems stunning in beautiful, twisted, and unique ways.    Which book will you take home? What has poetry taught you?  ...

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Julie Marie Wade Awarded 2014 To the Lighthouse Prize
Oct15

Julie Marie Wade Awarded 2014 To the Lighthouse Prize

“SIX,” Julie Marie Wade’s breathtaking manuscript, is the winner of AROHO’s 2014 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize.   Finalist Judge C.D. Wright wrote: “I chose SIX not in spite of but because of its discursiveness, its willingness to wander through the poem with technique at hand, but also a permit to allow both substantive and ephemeral material to wander into the field of the poem and exit without a conclusive goal in mind. It’s an accumulative project, inclusive, and busy about the business of sifting and sorting through this thing we call life that we carry out in this creation we call a body on this tumultuous blue orb we call earth.”            Born in Seattle in 1979, Julie Marie Wade completed a Master of Arts in English at Western Washington University in 2003, a Master of Fine Arts in Poetry at the University of Pittsburgh in 2006, and a PhD in Interdisciplinary Humanities at the University of Louisville in 2012. She is the author of Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures (Colgate University Press, 2010), winner of the Lambda Literary Award in Lesbian Memoir; Without: Poems (Finishing Line Press, 2010), selected for the New Women’s Voices Chapbook Series; Small Fires; Essays (Sarabande Books, 2011), selected for the Linda Bruckheimer Series in Kentucky Literature; Postage Due: Poems & Prose Poems (White Pine Press, 2013), winner of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series; Tremolo: An Essay (Bloom Books, 2013), winner of the Bloom Nonfiction Chapbook Prize; When I Was Straight: Poems (A Midsummer Night’s Press, 2014); and the forthcoming Catechism: A Love Story (Noctuary Press, 2016). A regular book reviewer for The Rumpus and Lambda Literary Review, Wade teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University.  She is married to Angie Griffin and lives in Dania Beach.   Special congratulations also to Finalist BT Shaw for her manuscript, “The Manual of Small Wars,” Finalist Stephanie Adams-Santos for her manuscript, “Swarm Queen’s Crown,” and to the four-hundred and fifty authors whose top-notch manuscripts we had the pleasure of...

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A. E. Stallings, 2015 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge
Oct15

A. E. Stallings, 2015 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge

AROHO is proud to announce  2015 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge, poet and translator A. E. Stallings. A. E. (Alicia) Stallings studied classics in Athens, Georgia and has lived since 1999 in Athens, Greece. She has published three books of poetry, Archaic Smile (1999), which won the Richard Wilbur Award; Hapax (2000); and Olives (2012). Her new verse translation of Lucretius (in rhyming fourteeners!), The Nature of Things, is published by Penguin Classics. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation. She lives with her husband, John Psaropoulos, editor of the Athens News, and their small argonaut, Jason. (Photo and bio courtesy of the PoetryFoundation.org)   Click here to apply to the 2015 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication...

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C.D. Wright, 2014 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge
Feb13

C.D. Wright, 2014 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge

The 2014 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge is renowned poet and chancellor at the Academy of American Poets, C.D. Wright. C.D. Wright was born in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, the daughter of a judge and a court reporter. She has published over a dozen books, includingRising, Falling, Hovering(2008); Like Something Flying Backwards: New and Selected Poems (2007); and a text edition of One Big Self: An Investigation(2003), a project she undertook with photographer Deborah Luster to document Louisiana inmates. She has also published several book-length poems, including the critically acclaimed Deepstep Come Shining (1998). Wright’s writing has been described as experimental, Southern, socially conscious, and elliptical; as a volume of selected poems, Steal Away demonstrates how Wright has not cleaved to any one voice or form but continues to evolve her style. As poet and critic Joel Brouwer asserts, “Wright belongs to a school of exactly one,” and Wright herself has pointed out the contradictions inherent in her work: “I’m country but sophisticated. I’m particular and concrete, but I’m probing another plane. . . . There are many times when I want to hammer the head. Other times I want to sleep on the hammer.” (Courtesy of the Poetry Foundation website.  Learn more about C.D.Wright and her poetry here.) “Poetry is a necessity of life,” Wright has said. “It is a function of poetry to locate those zones inside us that would be free, and declare them so.”   Click here to apply to the 2014 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize. ...

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Sarah Wetzel Awarded 2013 To the Lighthouse Prize
Dec15

Sarah Wetzel Awarded 2013 To the Lighthouse Prize

“River Electric with Light,” Sarah Wetzel’s astounding manuscript,  is winner of AROHO’s 2013 To the Lighthouse Poetry Book Prize.    Finalist Judge, Tracy K. Smith says, “Like the river of the collection’s title, these poems ride upon a current of arduous insight and indelible imagery.  And, like all courageous writing does, they make their own particular peace with the likelihood that even our most insistent questions–about love and human cruelty and belief–will never be adequately answered.”  Sarah Wetzel, poet and engineer, is the author of Bathsheba Transatlantic, which won the Philip Levine Prize for Poetry and was published in 2010. After having job-hopped across Europe and the Americas, Sarah will be teaching literature next year at The American University of Rome. She’ll still spend a lot of time writing on planes, dividing time between Manhattan, Rome, and Tel Aviv, Israel. Sarah holds an engineering degree from Georgia Tech and a MBA from Berkeley. She received an MFA in Creative Writing from Bennington College in January 2009. You can see some of her work at  www.sarahwetzel.com.   Special congratulations also to finalist Brittney Scott for her manuscript, “Ex-Votos,” and to the hundreds of authors whose top-notch manuscripts we had the pleasure of...

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Interrobang by Jessica Piazza
Aug19

Interrobang by Jessica Piazza

 Interrobang, winner of the 2011 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize Judge: Eloise Klein Healy Interrobang is a collection of mostly sonnets that play with various clinical “phobias” and “philias.” Jessica’s stunning, playful, dark, and haunting poems illustrate how “even the worst-case scenario of these pathologies are, fundamentally, just extensions of the dark truths to which every one of us can relate.”  You can read more about Jessica and Interrobang on her website here: http://www.jessicapiazza.com/   Buy This Book What an ear, here! Jessica Piazza’s poems are such etched, alive word sculptures, crystal prism poems of love and longing and punch. Aimee Bender I am such a fan of AROHO. Of course, winning the To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize in 2011 was an amazing moment, and changed my career forever. But aside from my own affiliation with the foundation, I’m just in awe of the work they do to promote women writers. AROHO–through retreats, wonderfully generous prizes, contests, and media support–is a champion combating the gender disparity we must all write through. I’m truly honored to represent AROHO, and I hope I do the foundation proud! –Jessica Piazza...

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Tracy K. Smith, 2013 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge
Jan01

Tracy K. Smith, 2013 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith is the Finalist Judge for the 2013 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize. About Tracy K. Smith’s Pulitzer Pize winning collection,  Life on Mars, Jessica Piazza, 2012 TTL recipient, says: “I’m most affected by “The Speed of Belief,” which is the long elegy poem that makes up a section in Life on Mars.  That poem is for her father, and I love to watch the poem move through trying to think about his loss while simultaneously confronting a universe so large, so filled with everyday loss and renewal that an individual life is both a huge, important thing and just a small part of everything.  It’s a fantastic poem in a fantastic book, and it’s particularly important to me now, as I struggle through my own loss.”     Update to Post: See Tracy’s selected winner, Sarah Wetzel, and read her comments about the winning work...

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Evie Shockley, 2012 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge
Jan01

Evie Shockley, 2012 To the Lighthouse Finalist Judge

Poet Evie Shockley is the 2012 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize finalist judge.          Update to Post: See Evie’s selected winner, Leia Penina...

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Leia Penina Wilson Awarded 2012 To the Lighthouse Prize
Dec15

Leia Penina Wilson Awarded 2012 To the Lighthouse Prize

The winner of our 2012 To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize was Leia Penina Wilson’s “I built a boat with all the towels in your closet.”  Selected by guest judge Evie Shockley, the book will be released by Red Hen Press in fall of 2014. Leia Penina Wilson spends most of her days baking tiny cakes and cookies. On the days she’s not baking, she plays Magic the Gathering and cuddles with her boyfriend on the couch. She’s an MFA candidate in prose at the University of Alabama. She is also the nonfiction editor for The Black Warrior Review. Her work can be found in, or is forthcoming from, Diagram, Alice Blue Review, Crab Orchard Review, The Chariton Review, NAP, and...

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Spoke & Dark by Carolyn Guinzio
Sep19

Spoke & Dark by Carolyn Guinzio

Spoke & Dark by Carolyn Guinzio, To the Lighthouse Poetry Publication Prize Winner, 2010 Judge: Alice Quinn There is no word for the place between the dying hand and the living hand that holds it, but there is a space between those hands. Spoke & Dark dwells there, in the tensions that inhere between one thing & another: lost & found, future & past, life & afterlife. Using typographical symbols (#, /, and especially &) to delineate these phantom spaces, Spoke & Dark explores the wild fluctuations in the nature of the known, searching for a language for the unknowable. Buy This Book   AROHO is a hugely important resource for women writers, and I was immensely grateful and honored that Spoke & Dark was brought into the light through its generosity. I’m proud to be a part of AROHO! —Carolyn Guinzio...

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Jessica Piazza Awarded 2011 To the Lighthouse Prize
Dec15

Jessica Piazza Awarded 2011 To the Lighthouse Prize

Jessica Piazza’s poetry collection “Interrobang” has been selected by judge Eloise Klein Healy as the 2011 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize winner.   Jessica Piazza was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. She earned her B.S. in Journalism from Boston University, where she began work as the Favorite Poem Project, serving as an undergraduate intern for United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky. Jessica cofounded the Speakeasy Poetry Series in NYC and then pursued her MA in English (Creative Writing) at UT Austin, where she helped create Bat City Review. In 2007 Jessica moved to Los Angeles to enter the Ph.D. program in English Literature and Creative Writing at USC, where she  co-founded Gold Line Press. Jessica has won a Keene Prize for Literature, is a contributing editor at The Offending Adam, and has blogged for The Best American Poetry and Barrelhouse. Her work has appeared in The National Poetry Review, Agni, Indiana Review, 32 Poems, The Missouri Review, Mid-American Review, No Tell Motel, 42 Opus, Pebble Lake Review, Rattle, Hobart, Country Dog Review, Coconut, Barefoot Muse, Forklift Ohio, and the anthologies 150 Contemporary Sonnets (University of Evansville Press) and Hot Sonnets (Entasis Press). She is currently working on a book of essays and lectures on writing with the poet Jill Alexander Essbaum, a series of erasure poems with fiction writer, essayist, and poet Heather O’Neill, a comedic memoir, and a group of short stories in iambic meter. Interrobang is her first collection of...

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