What Do My Artistic Ancestors Tell Me?
Mar22

What Do My Artistic Ancestors Tell Me?

“For the road was cut many years ago … many famous women, and many more unknown and forgotten, have been before me. But this freedom is only a beginning – the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared. How are you going to furnish it, how are you going to decorate it? With whom are you going to share it, and upon what terms? These, I think are questions of the utmost importance and interest. For the first time in history you are able to ask them; for the first time you are able to decide for yourselves what the answers should be.” ― Virginia Woolf, National Society for Women’s Service, 1931   share here   “Of all the forms of memory, ancient memory is the one that interests me most…I once saw a news photograph of an ancient dance artifact. It was a pottery shard with a design showing a tribal migration that was believed to be the earliest known representation of dance. It gave me a twinge, if not a shock, of recognition. I felt as though I have that illustrated moment stored in me genetically or else I wouldn’t be a dancer. That’s ancient memory. Every dance I make is a dive into this well of ancient memory.”   From Twyla Tharp, The Creative Habit: Learn it and Use it for Life   Suggested Reading to Supplement Your Own Inquiry   Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run With the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetypes Ursula K. Le Guin, The Wave in the Mind Twyla Tharp, The Creative Habit, and The Collaborative Habit Marion Woodman and Elinor Dickson, Dancing in the Flames: The Dark Goddess in the Transformation of Consciousness Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own Virginia Woolf, “But this freedom is only a beginning – the room is your own, but it is still bare,” Professions for Women, National Society for Women’s Service, 1931   Questions Arise for our Collaboration Q:  Does the artistic greatness of others play into or against my personal artistic intention and practice? Q: Do the voices of my artistic ancestors speak through my artistic identity, intention, and practice? Q: If I could respond to my artistic ancestors, what would I say? Q: Do I see myself part of women’s artistic ancestry?   Would you like to submit your responses to one of the questions above or to the featured Q? share here Dear Creative Woman, If you could speak with your artistic ancestors, what would you say? After nineteen years we...

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Who Am I as a Creative Woman
Jan18

Who Am I as a Creative Woman

submit your creative response...

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