Come Be With Us En El Jardin
Jul16

Come Be With Us En El Jardin

Dear Creative Woman, WE ARE FROM THE DESERT, THE DEEP FOREST, THE CLEARING BY THE RIVER, A UNIVERSE OF SECRET GARDENS.   “Help us to be ever faithful gardeners of the spirit, who know that without darkness nothing comes to birth, and without light nothing flowers.” — May Sarton “In search of my mother’s garden, I found my own.” — Alice Walker     “En El Jardin” by Karina Puente, symbol of AROHO’s Global Summer Camp   En El Jardin translates to In The Garden. The Guardian of Imagination is our Guide. Here in the garden, our senses are heightened and we notice that color is a medicinal frequency. We become aware of our heartbeat and feel it steady us. Our senses are awakened and we remember we have answers within. Read More Join Us for Global Summer Camp, 2021       “Life is Precious” by Tonya Russell   As a creative woman, my deepest need is: to create.   I consider myself an artist, a self-taught photographer with a borrowed camera. Photography is a way for me to connect with a part of myself I have yet to fully find. The world is changing, so am I. Little by little, I am understanding myself. Fragments are coming together and separating, creating a self-awareness I thought I had lost. Read More       “Magnolia 3” by Cynthia Yatchman   As a creative woman, my deepest need is: to do the work.   This piece is one of a series of prints using the Magnolia flower. I used a softer, almost buttery, linoleum-type product, very easy to carve, and latex house paint on watercolor paper. Influenced by these Corona times, the Magnolia’s universal symbolism is thought to be perseverance, beauty, and endurance. Read More     We respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices – both from our radiant anthology and from newly submitted work – into shared, published WAVES. With no limit to its future possibilities, we are publishing the anthology – piece by piece – in our monthly WAVES publication, and by digitizing all work from the anthology in the format of an online book serialization. For WAVES, begin...

Read More
That Which is Created Out of Chaos
Jun18

That Which is Created Out of Chaos

OUR WORK IS PROGRESS. Each one of us has the authority to speak urgently, moving beyond barriers to physical connection. Month after endless month, sister creatives have forged personal rooms spanning space and time. In competition at times with workplace productivity metrics, our children’s growth, and the tenuous safety of all, where does our creative well-being fit? Since 2019, WAVES has served as a vessel for our narratives and visions. In 2020, Global Summer Camp rose to transcend the pandemic chaos. Our personal reflection within this space calls us to healing; and when the creative process is emboldened, wisdom-sharing teaches us that progress is certain.   “What I got feels boundless. The energy to create along with the belief in myself and my project mirrored by my colleagues has fulfilled me in every session.” — Carol Prescott, Global Camper   Join Us Lend Your Voice and Vision to WAVES Submit       “Out of Chaos” by Margarita Cortes   In sum, this work is about: That which is created out of chaos.   Read more     … I was jealous she was writing, doing the writing I was jealous of. I was jealous that a part of me was writing while the other part was silent. I was jealous of the part that was not writing, enjoying her morning errands and barely regretting it. I was jealous that others didn’t even dream of writing, that they were free from the pain, the abscessed wound, of wanting to write and not writing …   “Writing” by Nina Pick   As a creative woman, my deepest need is: Time, space, and presence.   Read more       “Pandemic Journal #4” by Candace Richerson   As a creative woman, my deepest need is: To be remembered.   Read more       “Women Writers” by Guliz Mutlu   My hand-drawn illustration is dedicated to women writers. I used only pen as if they are writing.   Read more     We respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices – both from our radiant anthology and from newly submitted work – into shared, published WAVES. With no limit to its future possibilities, we are publishing the anthology – piece by piece – in our monthly WAVES publication, and by digitizing all work from the anthology in the format of an online book serialization. For WAVES, begin...

Read More
Our Rooted Boundlessness
May13

Our Rooted Boundlessness

  OUR ROOM IS SACRED. We honor our evolving self-agency as creative women and insist on our responsibility to each other by entering shared space with profound mutual respect for our personal time, dignity, artistry, ancestors, and culture. Original sharing, August 10, 2020, Inaugural Global Summer Camp   Lend Your Voice and Vision to WAVES Submit       “Stream of Reason” by Hilary Druley   Read More     “A good woman is not an artist by profession,” Momma warned me. “She does not waste her time writing immature poetry while surviving on the money she earns by dancing topless in a bar near Malcolm X Park. She educates herself, finds a good job – a teacher or librarian – and supports her husband and her children with the fruit of her career. When she retires then she can write novels and paint.” Momma cautioned me about the dangers of an artist’s life when in sixth grade I revealed that I wanted to write poetry. I painted my first canvas as a high school senior: “The Breast” – an enormous picture of my bronze right teat.   “Still Life with Flowers” by Beth Brown Preston   Read More       “Rooted Boundlessness” by Lara Von Waldenberg   In sum this work is about: The roots that support expansion. This speaks to my experience of grief, losing my mother 14 years ago. My foundation lost all grounding during the time of grief but has since evolved and transitioned into who I am today through healing the wounds of loss and finding truth. This experience built me and brought my mother closer than ever imagined.   Read More     I was born from an anonymous womb. Have I told you as soon as it happened, I was injected into other people’s lives? That I never knew my mother’s lap and I can still hear my birth mother’s deep voice? Have I told you my adopted mother’s voice was more soprano?   Have I told you I cried day and night to that unfamiliar voice who sang to me and rocked me in vain, amid sunny days and rainy nights? Should I tell you I was never able to find my birth mother, even though I tried? She vanished in time & space … Should I tell you I am not Black nor White and as such can’t claim either?   “Should That Be Enough?” by Cristina DeSouza   Read More     We respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices – both from our radiant anthology and from...

Read More
Woman’s Voice Singing Songs From the Savage Lands
Apr09

Woman’s Voice Singing Songs From the Savage Lands

  …[they] heard a woman’s voice singing, as if to her babies, a song so high and clear, it matched the flutes…She brought her songs back from the savage lands. Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts     It’s always important to tell the truth because if you don’t, there are all kinds of terrible social and psychological consequences. There are implosions and crazinesses that take place when you keep important energies and forces locked up inside of yourself. I think that some of our truths are things that are not dealt with in standard autobiography. Maxine Hong Kingston, from “Interview with Maxine Hong Kingston,” by Shelly Fisher Fishkin   Lend Your Voice and Vision in Creative Response Submit Sign Our Purpose Join Us for Global Camps Apply for Gifts of Sisterhood       “Sisters Dancing,” by Marie Jamieson   Read More     One night long after you passed I smelled perfume I smelled your scent as I huddled Shivering in front of the fire When hope had almost deserted me   And I remembered your words to watch the fire Listen for its answering me I heard and I acted I heard and I wrote I wrote and didn’t stop   “The Fireside Secrets,” by Ailsa Cawley   Read more       “Drenched in Emotions,” by Suchismita Das   Read More     He said to acclimate takes time and more money—heartwood slow to open, to breathe— one week became a month and more.   …   I wanted to speak my mind instead of smile— be nice— nice girls don’t speak their minds or question men— that would be cheap.   How dear it is to breathe.   “Breathing Fee,” by Tanya Ko Hong, excerpted from Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices   Read More     We respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices – both from our radiant anthology and from newly submitted work – into shared, published WAVES. With no limit to its future possibilities, we are publishing the anthology – piece by piece – in our monthly WAVES publication and by digitizing all work from the anthology in the format of a book serialization online. For WAVES, begin...

Read More
The tide of creative women is rising in waves
Mar12

The tide of creative women is rising in waves

This Women’s History Month we are invited to consider the gifts of our hard-won “irrevocably altered vision.” Shaped by heroic journeys and the braid of our collective memory, our circle of sister ancestors shoulder to shoulder with contemporary sister creatives is a tide rising in WAVES.   —what haunts us and what we would rather not inhabit, {is} the gulf between what is and what should be. The tool we marshal to cross our gulf is irrevocably altered vision. Sarah Lewis, The Rise: Creativity, The Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery       “Late,” by Luna Palazzolo Read more     Author Sarah Lewis goes on to challenge us: “How many movements began when an aesthetic encounter indelibly changed our past perceptions of the world?” Over 3000 women, from Albania to Zimbabwe, are signers of our AROHO purpose. The list is long and growing longer each day. Our invitation is to pause to appreciate the amalgam of all our stories and histories. This requires intention. There are roughly fifty passes of the screen to reach the last name and each pass is a universe of secret gardens that is us.   Find Your Name What does your irrevocably altered vision propel you toward? Submit here Sign Our Purpose Join Us for Global Camps Apply for Gifts of Sisterhood         “Just As I Am,” by Amanda Patrick   Read more     We respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices – both from our radiant anthology and from newly submitted work – into shared, published WAVES. With no limit to its future possibilities, we are publishing the anthology – piece by piece – in our monthly WAVES publication and by digitizing all work from the anthology in the format of a book serialization online. For WAVES, begin...

Read More
A dream that won’t let us sleep. Answer the thumping from within.
Feb12

A dream that won’t let us sleep. Answer the thumping from within.

This Black History Month, the world is buoyed by the beauty and power of Amanda S. C. Gorman, first National Youth Poet Laureate, and the legacy of Anna Julia Cooper, whose 1892 classic feminist text, A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, argued for both racial and gender equality. Each of us, as creative sisters, has a dream that won’t let us sleep. “I constantly felt (as I suppose many an ambitious girl has felt) a thumping from within unanswered by any beckoning from without.” – Anna Julia Cooper, author of A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South (1892)   Join Us for Global Camps OR Apply for Gifts of Sisterhood to attend here   Coming from a family of doctors, the only dream that I was allowed to nurture was one of becoming a doctor or – maybe, alternatively – that of being an engineer or civil servant. But the problem with those dreams was they made me drowsy instead of waking me up from slumber. The only thing that made me lose sleep at night was the ending of a story I had left incomplete, or the line that didn’t quite fit right, or a character that didn’t come out on paper as well as it was etched in my mind. While writing was considered to be a reputable hobby, it was “acceptable” only as a sidekick and not as the protagonist in the story of my life. “The Dream that Doesn’t Let Me Sleep” by Nazia Kamali Read more   goddess mother left us long ago her waters broke and we were thrust into a different world parched and dry and so we sought another god conceived entirely by the mind of man to rule the sky “redemption” by Valerie Forde-Galvin Read more       “Statuary Glory” by Janet Biehl Read more     For years I followed the moon path – like an eland slips behind a cypress when lions stalk or a sailor reefs the mainsail at the captain’s bark. But on Juniper Ridge my sun-self rose gold, never to set again. “Off the Moon Path” by Jane Schulman, Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices Read More         “Generativity” by Marsha Rosenzweig Pincus, Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices   Read more   In Our Room, we find engagement and expansion when we release the safety of a select, bounded circle around our creative lives. What is your creative anthem? Submit I release the feeling of obligation I have to organize priorities which are not necessarily mine but that I...

Read More
Reaching the water in time. Beginning anew.
Jan15

Reaching the water in time. Beginning anew.

  It seems we are hardwired to take stock on New Year’s. Dreams of a creative life, elusive but persistent like a loose tooth, negotiate their way onto a list in a new journal or – if too crazy, too impossible – scream their way out of our consciousness. At the New Year, we are supposed to begin anew but how do the leftovers of last year’s creative intentions allow space for this year’s? How do we begin anew day after day? How will we sustain our progress? We have imagined our best ever creative year. Virtual Global Camps are joyous gatherings validating women with serious creative intentions. We invite you to join us.   Join Us for Creative Renewal Day Camp and Apply for Gifts of Sisterhood here   ____________________________________________________   “Counting and What’s Counted On” by Robyn Hunt, Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices There’s a business adage, “What gets counted, counts.” Here is poet Robyn Hunt’s accounting. I know for sure: There is more inside of me that desires to be written. Not so sure about: Breaking the chain of more of the same … If I can swim back, quickly … Reaching the water in time … Whether the waves will flood my home if I open the windows wide. Know for sure: The waves will flood my home; I will open the windows wide. Counting and What’s Counted On     Read more   ____________________________________________________     “LC Adventure” art by Laura Curran   Read more ____________________________________________________ “Not permanence but change, its pace and direction, are all that matter.” – Freya Stark How many ways can we claim our creative identity? Skin deep, soulful, rhythmic, and crafty. – Patrice Thomas I’m a poet and translator who believes strongly in writing that is socially engaged. – Holly Karapetkova I’m a self-taught lesbian documentary photographer from Miami. I seek to capture raw beauty in people as they balance their lives between resilience and struggle. – Vanessa Charlot I am a daughter with a daughter and have pretended every woman written into A Room of One’s Own was/is one of my mothers. – Emily Bowles   ____________________________________________________     “Goddess on a Shelf” art by Jennifer Lothrigel, Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices   Read more   ____________________________________________________ Winners of Master Camp drawing are Jenny Douglas and Lynn Halper Rosen, PhD! Purchase Master Camp a la carte or in a special 3-Camp Bundle here “We wrote about something that needed to be finished, worked on, given attention to … We were on a mission to dig deep inside ourselves, and uncover our hidden potential … In a world full...

Read More
No Matter What State I’m In I Can Be Beautiful
Dec03

No Matter What State I’m In I Can Be Beautiful

How easy it is for us to find beauty in our creative sisters. In contrast, what images of our own creative selves do we tolerate or, worse, defend? Made from photos of her that she had previously rejected, “Self Portrait” taught Amber J. Deltorchio that “no matter what state I’m in I can be beautiful.” How can our artistic approach flip our perspective? Imagine what can be learned from our creative sisters. We crown our 20th year with the gift of our creative intentions – offerings of written and visual self-portraits that honor our creative selves and make room for our creative sisters.           “Self Portrait” art by Amber Deltorchio An artist and art educator, her art was created as an emotional healing tool that provided structure and love. “Self Portrait” – made from photos of her that she had critically rejected – showed Amber that “no matter what state I’m in I can be beautiful.”   _______________________________________________________   “Why Write?” by Penelope Dane   Because you were told hush. Because you used to sit in church, terrified you would stand, shouting that you hated God, Jesus, yourself, your family, this town. None of those things were true. Maybe it was the anti-depressants, filling your head with unspeakables. But in college, the Psychology of Addiction professor taught that drugs do not contain highs, they release them. If this is true, the unspeakables were always there, set loose in your synapses by a psychiatrist’s prescription pad. Because when you were four, you sat, constipated, swinging your legs in the mint tiled bathroom, singing heroic epic poems about yourself. You never wrote down the poems because it took until you were six to learn to write the alphabet. Because novels do not emerge, slime covered, fully formed like babies. You are no Doctorow. For you, writing a novel is not like driving at night, seeing only as far as the headlights but making the whole trip from notes to finished book in the dark. Following this metaphor, you spend two years, rising in the cold upstate New York mornings to write. After sunrise, you drive past dingy houses and wide snow covered fields to your tutoring job. You spit out 400 pages, not looking back, only ahead at the bit of illuminated road. When you read the pages, there is no novel. There are ten scenes, written over and over, blurred mimeographs of themselves. You print this out, snap it into a 3-ring binder, which you hide in the closet. You buy German and Japanese pencils. A lined notebook. A cast iron teapot. In the early summer light, you write only...

Read More
Healing Across Time and Space
Nov06

Healing Across Time and Space

Dear Creative Woman, To begin to comprehend our need for each other, consider the medieval pair Hildegard von Bingen (a mystic cloistered from age eight) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (a queen imprisoned by her husband for sixteen years), who forged an epistolary relationship. Today, we are no longer forced to wait patiently for letters to cross seas, yet our connection is equally precious. __________________________________________________________ “At a time when I was resurfacing from illness and isolation, the encouragement … in ‘A Room of Her Own’ enabled me to reboot my dreams … and stalled projects … changing my whole perspective as a viable artist.” – Rosalinda Ruiz-Scarfuto, Global Summer Camper (Spain), 2020 AROHO Grant Writing Fellow, newest book A Poet’s Survival Journal in the Covid-19 Pandemic Global Day Camps bring us together, amplifying the muses at our table and summoning back bits of us that have been floating, unmoored. Our November day camps featuring WAVES contributors in residence still have space available, Nov. 7 and Nov. 21. Join us! Join Us for Global Day Camp   Raging Wave” art by Carolyn Wright Read More __________________________________________________________ Get sick, stay in bed and that’s what happens. You become a ghost in your own life. Bits of me are floating back like moons to their Mother planet. No one else has this exact memory Of honey on toast or this bitter echo of a child lost. I water the rosemary, sweep away cobwebs, let light and sound Stitch my wounds, healing across time and space. “Coming Back” by Beverly Lafontaine, Writer in Residence, Global Day Camp, November 21 Read More __________________________________________________________ Brigid was the Celtic goddess of poetry. She also ruled over fire and healing and metalwork. The first three made sense to me, but I did not come to understand metalwork until one day, typing away at my computer, I suddenly saw the metal of it. The metal of the box that held it. The metal wires and components inside. The metal conduits to the electrical grid that brought power into it. The metal towers that provided signals and service for this communication. “No Faith Without Body” by Cassie Premo Steele Read More “Golden One” art by Lyndia Radice, Artist in Residence, Global Day Camp, November 7 Read More     In honor of Diwali, Hindu Festival Day, November 14, we offer the gift of Bhanu Kapil’s words, “When you speak your truth, there will be waves in the desert.” A 2020 winner of the Cholmondeley Award from the UK Society of Authors for distinguished achievement in poetry and former member of AROHO’s Board of Directors, Bhanu’s luminous presence, unique take on...

Read More
And Rose Our Voices Like Waves
Oct05

And Rose Our Voices Like Waves

Dear Creative Woman, Today we respond to the call of our times and our community to release the confluence of women’s voices — both from our anthology and new work — into shared, published WAVES. Our New WAVES         “Dragging Virginia Woolf’s Body Out of the Ouse” WAVES digital cover art by Christy Sheffield Sanford, Artist in Residence, Global Day Camp, Oct. 24   __________________________________________________________   “There Was a Door” by Leatha Kendrick, from Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices “There was a door to the river I never lived beside — a door on its changing shoreline, its shining.                  My hand on the lever.”   (Previously published in her 2020 book, And Luckier)   Read More   __________________________________________________________   “At Least Prostitutes Bring Home Money” by Sokunthary Svay, from Waves: A Confluence of Women’s Voices “My whole life you never know who I am.”   Read More   __________________________________________________________   “Leaves are Waves are Us” by Sacha Rosel, New Work Watercolour pencils on paper (10x10cm/39.37inchesx39.37inches) and poem, August 2020   In the phosphorescent hem of light I met my sisters, a crumpled heap forgotten on the ground. We exhaled our trembling births, an oval breath expanding from each other’s filaments, and made our secret sound happen, jade-leaping into a new truth, jumping blue streams and pearlish-grey purples, fuchsia enchantment of chromatic prayers, instants lost and erased. And rose our voice like waves stronger than wind, until the world was now and us and our story unwritten, finally loud and vivid: We are the instants beyond silence, and the words within silence rising like fire in the sky.   I consider the small painting and the poem as one single work, as they were both created as my personal comment to the AROHO Global Summer Camp 2020 experience....

Read More
We Ask Our Ancestors to Speak to Us
Sep11

We Ask Our Ancestors to Speak to Us

In Women Who Run with the Wolves, Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés says, “Asking the proper question is the central action of transformation.” The process by which AROHO invites submissions is an invitation into call-and-response, a shared dialogue as women of the world and, deeper still, into our own transformations. We paused on Friday for 9/11 to remember; and in honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month this September, we celebrate the richness of “origins” and culture, and we ask the ancestors to speak to us. ___________________________________________________________________________________________ “Like the Women before Me” by Ashley Fernandes, in response to “What Do My Ancestors Tell Me?” They whisper to me at night, softly into the crevices of my mind, as my body lulls into a state of drowsiness. On the brink of sleep, I hear them – they’re female, but they sound deep, raspy, and soulful like that of wise women who speak for all it’s worth. “Write the poem,” they tell me. My eyes dart open, my heart beats faster and arrhythmically. “Tell the story.” “I don’t know where to start,” I think back to them, pulling the covers up to my chin and squeezing my eyes shut. “Or what to even write about.” “Write from the legacy of women before you,” they say, and I wrap my blanket around me tighter.   Although I cannot see them, there are weary smiles and crinkled eyes in their voices, I can feel it in my bones that ache for sleep. They have lived lives full of damnation, of hardship, of rights and opportunities stripped away from them. I know they are the women before me that used art as a symbol of their determination, of their battles they refused to give up. Reinventing the definition of beauty, breaking out against the norm of normalcy to create pieces of noble history – the things that women can do if given the chance, written in their fiery legacy. “Write about us.”   And so, like Toni Morrison, who defied all odds with her bouts of necessary wisdom, I use my freedom to free others. I rise from my bed, and I sit down to tear away the fibres of my mind, letting the darkest parts of me spill onto paper. Through an opening of the heart, the selfishness of man comes apart.   Like Georgia O’Keeffe, a goddess of art and femininity, I paint, but with words. Strokes of vowels and consonants and splashes of thought hit the page through smears of raven ink, drawing pictures of lands far away and flowers too beautiful to be real. As I listen to the sound of the...

Read More
What Does It Mean to Be a Creative Woman?
Aug07

What Does It Mean to Be a Creative Woman?

  What does it mean to be a creative woman? In the call to gather in a virtual women-led, intention-setting creative workspace called Global Summer Camp, so many of you responded from around the world that we expanded our original attendance to include more women. We are from seven different countries and stunningly-diverse backgrounds, and AROHO is galvanized to make more room for more women in gatherings to come. Congratulations to the Gift of Fellowship recipients for our flagship GSC! If you were unable to make our Summer gathering, please stay tuned for our Global Fall Camp! To see the recipients for The Amanda Gorman Fellowship for one young woman poet of color, The “Voices of Women Artists during the Pandemic” Gift of Fellowship for an international woman mentor and international woman  mentee, and The Global Summer Camp Gift of Fellowship for five registrants, go to our Global Summer Camp Gifts of Fellowship. _________________________________________________________ “An Artist” by Nancy Iannitelli Ink and Gold Leaf on Vellum paper, 2020, in response to “Who Am I as a Creative Woman?” My spirituality lies in all that is good. I believe my talent is a gift from a greater power than myself. – Nancy Iannitelli . . _________________________________________________________ “Diss Track” by Fiona Alwora, excerpt of spoken poetry Tempting as it is to build a pyre and be done with it/ Keep those sticks and stones/ Trust me/ Build a bridge and watch who finds their way to you. . . I was born and raised in Kenya and moved to the US at 19. I went from being a member of the majority to finding my voice as one of an extreme minority. I came to poetry out of necessity. – Fiona...

Read More
A Gift to the Silenced
Jul10

A Gift to the Silenced

You hold space with us in this world for diverse women’s voices. It is the call of our times to reach together across limitations to connect in rooms of our own making and to amplify each other’s voices and our creative work. We are excited to share a new vision for AROHO gatherings, Global Summer Camp. This is one way we are making more room. Inspired by women’s requests in The Q and our recent “Voices of Women Artists during the Pandemic” webinar with St. Pauls College in Bangalore, we have imagined five days in August for breakthroughs in creative projects, women-led wisdom sharing, and joyous discovery. ________________________________________________________ Global Summer Camp Available for 2- or 5-days. Funds support open-access submissions for diverse women around the world this 2020. Find more on Global Summer Camp here. The first 5 women to register will receive a special Gift of Fellowship mentoring session for your creative projects! More details will be provided via email after your space is reserved. Art by Karina Puente, hostess of GSC ________________________________________________________ “Bendita No. 4 A Gift to the Silenced” Ink and Gold Leaf on Vellum paper, 2020 Maria Emilia Faedo In 1961, I was an unaccompanied Cuban child arriving in Miami during kinder times. Today, my work is in collections such as FIU and USF Public Art. I received an Art Matters NY Fellowship and was featured on the Smithsonian’s curriculum “Expressions of Assimilation.” This is one of several mixed media Benditas who – neither virgins nor saints – stand as a visual reminder that rich forces of courage may be friends, sisters, teachers … Who they are and how they came into your lives is of little importance. What matters is that you stand ready to open your door. –Maria Emilia Faedo ________________________________________________________ “Disturb” by Melinda Jane, the Poet Mj The first physical act of rebellion is to speak words out loud to yourself. The second act of rebellion is to speak them out loud to another. The third is to a crowd an outcry this is this, is this… Betwixt outcry is breath the out of rebellion in transmission of memes. Respiratory infection gestation of ideas. Prayer not taken up from demolition words distill, disturb the air. Undercurrents of the unknown direction. I am the author of the poetry book, Nature’s Nuptials, the children’s book, The Currawong and the Owl, and fifty-three written works published in international anthologies and literature journals like Mekong Review, Rattle, Dime Show Review, Hawai‘i Review, Rambutan Literary etc. – Melinda Jane, the Poet...

Read More
Voice of Women Artists During the Pandemic
Jun17

Voice of Women Artists During the Pandemic

On June 24, 2020, St. Paul’s College and AROHO Foundation participated in an international webinar on “Voice of Women Artists during the Pandemic.” Panelists Darlene Chandler Bassett, Karina Puente, and Sun Cooper participated live with Moderator Saranya Francis, with a special video message from Bhanu Kapil. AROHO is grateful to Saranya Francis and St. Pauls College for making this shared space possible, and to every participant who brought their presence here. It was a different kind of WAVES, one that reached across limitations of location and time, in order to connect and share women’s voices. If you participated in the webinar or wanted to and were unable to, we would love to invite you into this community of women and to hear from you. To sign up for WAVES or submit your creative work, please find more by selecting the “Submit” or “Subscribe” blue buttons in the sidebar. If you would like to watch the “Voice of Women Artists During the Pandemic” international webinar, please scroll to the bottom of this page and click on the link to watch in full. Enjoy!   ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________   Watch “Voice of Women Artists During the Pandemic in full, broadcast begins at 31:45! https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EblDLeRwSwqpgVVgPgteGH_t0n0cVaFP/view?invite=CP6kmO0F&ts=5f067dcd     Reading from WAVES: A Confluence of Women’s Voices, Darlene Chandler...

Read More
The Fire is a Kind of Breath Too
Jun12

The Fire is a Kind of Breath Too

A Room of Her Own Foundation has always worked to elevate women’s voices from around the world to help us find each other and make waves. This is why AROHO aligns in principle with anti-racism and justice movements. We are committed to our moral and mutual responsibility to each other, and to the principle of inclusion that honors, engages, and sustains our diverse, global community. We stand with our sisters for love, equality, and change. Our digital Waves archive and bookshelf houses extraordinary Black women’s work.  Among them, find t’ai freedom ford’s To The Lighthouse Winner book, how to get over.  In partnership with INKPEN, AROHO is donating 40 titles for young student readers. Would you like to help us give more? To meet the historic surge of the movement together, we dedicate this Waves to elevating Black women’s voices and we carry our vow forward by inviting dialogue, sustaining open-access submissions, and robustly publishing diverse voices in WAVES.   To help us donate more books to INKPEN, find the link below. To support these Black women writers and artists, click on their names to find their websites and/or books and art, find them on social media, share them, and purchase their creative work. Don’t miss a very special offer at the close.   _______________________________________________________________________   “you ain’t seen nothing yet” by t’ai freedom ford underneath the floor’s unforgiving squeak lives a boy forever crying i wonder the shape of his tears: bulbous diameter of saltwater how might i measure the radius of his grief? how many droughts could be solved by this unhappy child? some days i long to braid his tears into song – other days i want to collect the sour milk breath of each wail in a mason jar and carry it off into the world: show this lil boy what sadness is all about. t’ai freedom ford, “you ain’t seen nothing yet” from our To the Lighthouse Winner how to get over Having my book enter the world is my proudest accomplishment and I am so very grateful to AROHO for blessing me and countless other women with this opportunity. – t’ai freedom ford   In partnership with INKPEN, AROHO is donating forty copies of how to get over by t’ai freedom ford for young student readers in one classroom (25) and one book club (15) at an under-resourced public-school library in DC.  Join us by making a special purchase of t’ai’s book to add to the number of students who receive this powerful, contemporary voice which speaks to their life and culture.   Donate a copy from AROHO’s bookshelf here.   _______________________________________________________________________   “I’ve...

Read More
What is Summoned Forth?
May08

What is Summoned Forth?

What is summoned forth for you these days? At our April invitation for creative women to submit, a surge arrived speaking to ancestors. Whether by sirens of courage or whispers of persistence, we are compelled to meet each other in the waves and listen to the stories coming from the depths, “from everything.” Find and share these women and their works in full. Names are in bold for those who have provided more about where you can find them. How do your artistic ancestors speak to you? Find the submit button to your right. _______________________________________________________   “Siren Songs and Sea Stories” by Jane Baldrige-Fisher The ocean lures us with its beauty. I am a life long sailor and artist, who studied art at California Institute of Art (Valencia, CA) and the Alfred G. Glassel Museum School (Houston, TX). Being a creative requires being fearless. I was influenced by John Baldessari, at Cal Arts, to never repeat what has been done. My artwork has been exhibited in Times Square, The Musée du Louvre, Lincoln Center, Museum of Computer Art, Mint Museum, Cameron Museum of Art, Fayetteville Museum of Art, World Festival of Art on Paper and has her 911 tribute, in the Library of Congress.  – Jane Baldridge-Fisher _________________________________________________________ “Creative Ancestors Speak” by Alexandra Newton Rios My artistic ancestors tell me to persist. Do not give up, though the world pandemic seems unreal, though [hard] days teaching the Spanish language on long distance learning waves, where I try to reach each student individually and make each one laugh while they learn together, leaves me less time … it is needed more than ever – my words written with depth, honed with vision. My artistic ancestors are mystics in times of pestilence that grew angry with the lies and corruption of priests and the Church around them and responded. They speak easily to a divinity within themselves, with God, with the Virgin Mary. Julian of Norwich in England became an anchorite and lived in the smallest of rooms as a room of her own. I found Julian through the poetry of Denise Levertov who wrote one of her Showings as a spinoff from Julian’s Revelations. I read Julian of Norwich’s Revelations and Caterina of Siena’s letters who wrote from a dukedom that would later become Italy. I wrote poems to both ancestors as a direct dialogue. And then the fourteenth century answered and fiction became real. The Julian/Caterina Project was born. I am a bilingual, bi-hemispherical writer, translator and teacher, runner of marathons. in this time of pandemic I am writing and teaching from northwestern Argentina, a place where there is...

Read More
In a Time Apart, What Does It Mean to Have a Room of Your Own?
Apr10

In a Time Apart, What Does It Mean to Have a Room of Your Own?

In a time spent apart, our creativity becomes resourceful. Our rituals are a reminder of what roots us. Our community and virtual acts of connection are all the more vital, and yet the claim to our own space all the more necessary, too. What does it mean now to have room of your own? Has it changed or remained the same? If a photograph, an essay, a poem, a piece of art could reflect your “room” in these historic days, what would it look like?  Tell us … Do you have a room of your own? Find the submit button to the right. ____________________________________________________ “My Mac is My Room of My Own” by Carol Radsprecher   I’m a native Brooklynite who will never leave. I’m a longtime painter who taught myself some Photoshop and find that this medium suits me perfectly. I have an MFA in painting from Hunter College, CUNY. Very liberal politically; atheist; elderly; little money. English-speaking only, unfortunately. You can find me at my website: www.carolradsprecher.com. On Facebook: Carol Radsprecher. On Instagram: @cradsprecher. Be safe, all! ____________________________________________________   “A Room of My Own” by Christiana Martin Give me a place where sunlight spills in unfettered, spreading itself out like a lazy cat. Give me a space where words may come to me unhindered and flow out onto notebook paper. Give me a room with no color on the walls so the colors can float in front of me. Give me a room with windows to match my open heart. Give me a room where my body can explore my ideas, where I can take up all the space I want. Give me a door that I can close when my soul selects its own society. Give me a journal so I can soar or plunge. Give me music that makes me think. Give me a room big enough to hold all of who God made me. Give me a room quiet enough to embrace my loud. Give me a workshop to write this down. I used creative license by putting a twist on Virginia Woolf’s title “A Room of One’s Own” and by making an allusion to Emily Dickinson’s “The Soul Selects Her Own Society.” I am a Christian who loves to use the creativity I was given. I am in my senior year at Messiah College. I believe art is a great communicator, and I’m excited to share mine with the world. I have a blog, which you can check out here: hellohumanitysite.wordpress.com ____________________________________________________     “Where I Live and What I Do There” by Henri Bensussen There is a brook behind Brookdale, the senior...

Read More
Palace of Pages
Mar13

Palace of Pages

In lean times, we find our sustenance. Feast on “bread and roses” from women in your community who are sharing their creative origin stories. Our resilient pageant continues: in a climate where many art programs are cutting back and communities worldwide are thinking more deeply about how to better take care of each other, we are sustaining open-access submissions this year for any woman who would like to share her story, her creative work, her room of her own. Women’s voices will be supported; Waves continue to build. As always, find your own invitation to submit in the side bar and consider giving $20 in honor of 20 years of advocacy and, together, we build us “a palace of pages.” _______________________________________________________________________________     Lazarus Nazario, “Rose Cottage,” an origin story I aim to catch the viewer off guard; have them rethink what they see. Through paintings & drawings I confront individual, political, and collective disconnection. – Lazarus Nazario     _______________________________________________________________________________     Ava Garfinkel, an origin story “Ginsberg and Dickinson Told Me Who I’d Be” I breathed in words like bread baking, I built us a palace of pages, I grew impatient with my own mind. This was the life I once chose, This is the world I ran from. This feels like the person I am. He told me I’d be angry He taught me to be bold, He made me face my worst fears. She holds me when I’m alone. She whispers secrets of beauty She pushes me toward the world. They cradle me in stanzas, They wrap me inside prose. They open up my rundown head, They stand behind me waiting, For the next words to reach my page. I am a 23 year old queer Jewish poet from small town Manitoba. I have an MFA in Art history and am beginning a masters degree in September 2020. I enjoy writing poetry when I’m procrastinating on assignments. I’ve been writing and procrastinating since I was seven years old. – Ava Garfinkel...

Read More
Celebrating 20 Years of Creative Women
Feb14

Celebrating 20 Years of Creative Women

In celebration of 20 Years of Creative Women and in the spirit of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment for women’s rights, we begin by inviting you to a year-long pageant of supporting and elevating each other’s voices. Alongside our new monthly series sharing excerpts from the upcoming Waves anthology, together we are sustaining open-access submissions this year for any woman who would like to share her story, her creative work, her room of her own. Enjoy contributions from women in your community and find your own invitation below.   _____________________________________________________________________   Virginia Danz, “The Awakening” . Ten years ago after a rewarding career as a mental health counselor, I decided to take a chance on a career as a painter. The #MeToo movement had a profound effect on me, as did turning 50 and losing my father last year. I feel like I’ve awakened from a long nap, shrugging off the patriarchy and becoming my own mentor. I am now creating the most authentic, truly satisfying work of my life. I’m thrilled to find a community space online that honors and lifts up women’s voices. My work can be found at www.gingerdanz.com and @gingerdanzart on instagram. – Virginia Danz _____________________________________________________________________     Rebecca Harvey, “Bone”   Raised to be a good girl in the Midwest, I greatly failed my parents by climbing trees and playing in the mud. A further disappointment when I dropped out of Father’s law school alma mater to pursue art. Ended up ok, I learned to be a room of my own. – Rebecca Harvey _____________________________________________________________________     Nazli Karabiyikoglu, “Throwing Off the Blanket” How many types of going are there? Walking away, leaving for good, acts of escaping are hung on which part of going? What is the purpose of going and why do we hide behind the term leaving away when we are overwhelmed with life? Where does humanity stand between the inability to go, although desiring, and cutting loose through the backstitch of going and leaving? I’ve been thinking about these questions for years and all of them unravel quite different questions. In order to get out of the question labyrinth in which I’m lost, I have to go once more. I think I like questions mostly because of that.   My travels began in the back of the yellow car, with the mark of my pink plaid pillow on my face. The wind blowing through the car’s window, the sun that made my eyes squint, the dizziness of the child-me who just woke up turned the back seat into a one-person, magical brougham. The scenery, trees, steppes, and forests...

Read More
A Room of Her Own for the Season
Nov22

A Room of Her Own for the Season

    During this season, we understand how full these festive and holy times can be; may the women’s voices and art shared here be a warm beacon. This is one way we make room for ourselves and for each other. Do you have a room of your own? Submit your creative response/work for possible publication with AROHO. Find the “submit” button on this page. Enjoy these creative women’s words and art and truth.     “Her Hands in Bloom” by Liz Asch I am her.  She is me.  We are folded in a collective She.  This girl.  Risen up like a flower in a brown potato field.  Fields of Russia.  Poland.  Germany.  Austria-Hungary.  Jewess.  My daughter, my ancestor, my lover, my grandmother.  The bright shape of her wafts through each blackened shtetl.  Where she sleeps in a cotton gown on a straw bed, dreaming she is a sylph caught in the river’s current.  The candles of the sky shine on her.  Dollbaby.  Poet.  A father’s daughter.  Have you seen my girl, such beautiful hands! Our baby, whispered over her, each time, fingers tracing the felt-like fur fringing her newborn ears.  The soft collar of fuzz that trails up her neck as she grows.  Wispy strands elongate from her temples, brow, nape.  Her head’s thick blanket fingered into braids, tucked in a bonnet for sleep, wavy as a waterfall by day.  Dark curls brushed in a high basket or left unruly and wild, pinned low at her shoulders.  Wet tendrils like serpents tamed into domesticity, hypnotizing a woman’s back.  Just to be there, to be allowed, to touch her skin, to run down the river of her spine. This Jewess, my ancestor, when the air flickers around me like shabbos candles, it is her hands, shadow-birds, freed in an act of consecration, that I feel.  Ephemeral, silent, made of her fingers, the only shadows allowed to dance—to unlock their wings, to reach. We, the women in my lineage, we don’t tell our secrets, we hide them in our mouths.  They soften to pulp within us.  Our bodies are dark nights.  Our throats are the tunnel where the moon rises, it waxes in our wombs.  A beam of light searching a galaxy.  Oh, mystery! Breathe it.        Whisper it.       Write it.           Swallow. Would that we could wander, were we not domesticated by the family’s yoke, by a rope of a ring around a finger, by society’s glare, by the fences staked around our breasts, our hips, our thighs. Strands of her hair fallen into her undershirt, wasted on her bedsheets, dusting the floor, snaked through her comb.  Tufts of her hair...

Read More